Dating violence abuse statistics

Do you think that teen dating violence can't happen to your son or daughter? Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on teen dating violence tell a different story.Think she's too young to have that happen, or that it won't happen because he's a boy? The current statistics on teen dating violence tell a scary story: In addition to physical violence, many teens are in controlling or emotionally abusive relationships.

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Abusing, battering, assaulting or raping another person is a criminal offence.Domestic Abuse has far-reaching social implications for everyone, affecting the abused person’s ability to lead a productive life and encouraging children brought up in an abusive home to repeat the cycle themselves and having a detremental impact on their emotional and sometimes physical well-being.A lot of doctors and hospital time and funds are needed to help those who have been victimised or beaten. It is estimated that 1 in 4 women live in abusive relationships, and within our lifetime half of us can expect to be the victim of domestic or intimate violence. More women are killed by their partner or ex-partner than by a stranger (current UK statistics suggest one woman is murdered by her partner or expartner every 3 days).In the same way as we tend to have a stereotypical picture of what domestic abuse is, we have similar pictures of what sort of person both the abused and the abuser are.Our perceptions tend to be biased by myths, perpetuated both by the media and by society in general, and are unrelated to the reality or the extent of Domestic Abuse. Following is a list of some myths and facts of domestic abuse: Abuse only happens in certain "problem" families, ethnic minorities, uneducated or poorer areas. White collar workers are just as likely to abuse their wives as are blue-collar workers; financially independent people are just as likely to suffer abuse as are people on low incomes.

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