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The reactor offered neutron- and gamma-radiation damage testing services. In June 1997, the Ford Nuclear Reactor Review Committee submitted a report to the Vice President for Research (Vince Pecoraro, at the time) on the future of the FNR.

The Committee estimated thatthe reactor was costing the university

The reactor offered neutron- and gamma-radiation damage testing services. In June 1997, the Ford Nuclear Reactor Review Committee submitted a report to the Vice President for Research (Vince Pecoraro, at the time) on the future of the FNR.The Committee estimated thatthe reactor was costing the university $1 million / year.Letters had been sent to various university departments as well as to other institutions that made use of the reactor, asking for input on their use of the facility. Alex Halliday and Eric Essene from the department of Geology relied heavily on the reactor for their research in Ar-40—Ar-39 aging, and sent strong praise of the reactor.Gary Was from the department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science explained that over 15 NERS courses rely on the reactor, as well as nearly every professor's research.Iodine-131 and Neptunium-59 were produced as a radioactive tracer for the medical school, Bromine-82 was produced for the auto companies, who made use of it to track oil consumption in internal combustion engines.The reactor was also used to train utility workers in 1-2 week nuclear instrumentation and reactor operation courses.The Department of Energy fabricated, transported, and disposed of the fuel at no cost to the University.

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The reactor offered neutron- and gamma-radiation damage testing services. In June 1997, the Ford Nuclear Reactor Review Committee submitted a report to the Vice President for Research (Vince Pecoraro, at the time) on the future of the FNR.

The Committee estimated thatthe reactor was costing the university $1 million / year.

Letters had been sent to various university departments as well as to other institutions that made use of the reactor, asking for input on their use of the facility. Alex Halliday and Eric Essene from the department of Geology relied heavily on the reactor for their research in Ar-40—Ar-39 aging, and sent strong praise of the reactor.

Gary Was from the department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science explained that over 15 NERS courses rely on the reactor, as well as nearly every professor's research.

million / year.

Letters had been sent to various university departments as well as to other institutions that made use of the reactor, asking for input on their use of the facility. Alex Halliday and Eric Essene from the department of Geology relied heavily on the reactor for their research in Ar-40—Ar-39 aging, and sent strong praise of the reactor.

Gary Was from the department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science explained that over 15 NERS courses rely on the reactor, as well as nearly every professor's research.

Research was performed in many multi-disciplined areas.Outside the University community, the Michigan State University Department of Geological Science, Louisiana State University, the University of Nevada Las Vegas, Buchtel College of Arts and Sciences, the University of California Santa Barbara, the University of Georgia, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, NIST, the , Sandia National Lab, EPRI, Ford, and GM all expressed interest in keeping the reactor operational, while NASA (among others) had no interest.In recent years, however, the reactor's use by the U-M academic community has declined substantially to the point where the bulk of the users now come from the federal government and industry.Fred Smith, a local alumnus, suggested a project looking into the peaceful uses of nuclear power.A full page poster was printed in the Michigan Daily suggesting that the Phoenix Project will show that Americans can work to benefit the world.

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